Info

Brother The Land Robert Swindells

Above: Illustration from Brother in the Land, written by Robert Swindells.

[Copyright© Caret Press.]

Left: Illustration from Black Jack the Footpad, written by E. Cowan.

Above: Illustration from Brother in the Land, written by Robert Swindells.

[Copyright© Caret Press.]

Left: Illustration from Black Jack the Footpad, written by E. Cowan.

Jack Swindells

Another way to make a feature of one part of a composition is to give that part greater liveliness and contrast. Any single area in which there is a concentration of contrasting shapes or tones immediately attracts the eye.

The centre of interest may be 'framed' by other picture elements, so isolating it within its own small, clear area. This device once again makes a special feature of a single picture element, which consequently appears more important.

Above: Illustration of skiers.

[Copyright© Fleetway 1991.]

Left: Illustration of the Ghost of Mrs Barwick from

Yorkshire Oddities, written by S. Baring-Gould.

[Copyright© Smith Settle Ltd.]

Below: Illustration from Black Jack the Footpad, written by E. Cowan. [Copyright © D. C. Thompson.]

Jack Cowan

Above: Illustration of skiers.

[Copyright© Fleetway 1991.]

Left: Illustration of the Ghost of Mrs Barwick from

Yorkshire Oddities, written by S. Baring-Gould.

[Copyright© Smith Settle Ltd.]

Below: Illustration from Black Jack the Footpad, written by E. Cowan. [Copyright © D. C. Thompson.]

Right: From Black Jack the Footpad, written by E. Cowan. [Copyright © D. C. Thompson.] Below: Illustrations from Hunters of Tropicanus. [Copyright© D. C. Thompson.]

Hunters Tropicanus

Above left: Illustration from Black Jack the Footpad, written by E. Cowan. [Copyright © D. C. Thompson.]

Above left: Illustration from Black Jack the Footpad, written by E. Cowan. [Copyright © D. C. Thompson.]

Directional Lines

In looking at a picture, the viewer's eye is unconsciously directed around the picture area by the arrangement of lines and shapes. So far we have considered ways in which the most important item in the picture can be made to stand out, but we can guide the attention towards other areas too. In so doing we are able to give greater or lesser importance to other elements, as the meaning and purpose of the picture dictates.

In the pair of illustrations shown here, the picture elements consist of a man, a tree and a rabbit. In the example on the left the focal point - the centre of interest - is the man. Both tree and rabbit are subsidiary details - just part of the surroundings. In the second example, however, it is the rabbit that is important. By rearranging the three picture elements - and without altering the size of any of them - we have changed the entire message and meaning of the picture.

There are a number of ways in which this control of composition can be exercised. The most obvious is through the use of lines.

Lines can be used as pathways along which the eye will naturally travel within the picture area. They can also provide a link between one feature and another, controlling the viewer's perception of what is important and what is not.

Here again is Little Red Riding-Hood (picture 1). As we saw before, our eye naturally alights on her because everything else in the picture forms a related-shape pattern. If we now provide her with a footpath to walk along and a patch of woodland flowers (2), our eye naturally travels along the pathway leading from the flowers to Little Red Riding-Hood. Flowers and girl are linked, and our perception is that she probably stopped for a while on her journey to pick flowers for her grandmother.

Now add a Big, Bad Wolf (3). By placing him where he is we ensure that the continuation of the woodland path directs the eye to him. Since the Wolf is looking at Little Red Riding-Hood, our attention is diverted back to her; but the direction of her walking returns the eye to him, and so on. Thus a static image - which is all any picture can be - produces a dynamic response in the reader/viewer, thereby creating a tension that enlarges the message conveyed by the picture.

It makes no difference if we add a bird in the branches or a clump of flowers by a foreground treetrunk (4). These are not important because they are not linked to the main centre of interest.

In the other three illustrations on this page, the footpath and the receding surfaces of the boat and the car are used to give the picture depth as well as to lead the eye towards the focal point.

Left: Illustration from The Bionic Man. [Copyright © ITV.]

Left: Illustration from The Bionic Man. [Copyright © ITV.]

Fanny Hill IllustrationsMajor Eazy

Left: Illustration from Major Eazy.

[Copyright © Fleetway 1991.]

Left: Illustration from Major Eazy.

[Copyright © Fleetway 1991.]

Major Eazy ImageFanny Hill Illustrator

Above: Illustration from Mother is a Star. [Copyright © D. C. Thompson.] Right: Illustration for John Cleland's Fanny Hill. Opposite, top: Illustration from Major Eazy.

[Copyright© Fleetway 1991.]

Above: Illustration from Mother is a Star. [Copyright © D. C. Thompson.] Right: Illustration for John Cleland's Fanny Hill. Opposite, top: Illustration from Major Eazy.

[Copyright© Fleetway 1991.]

lil atoi

Was this article helpful?

0 0
How To Become A Professional Pencil Drawing Artist

How To Become A Professional Pencil Drawing Artist

Realize Your Dream of Becoming a Professional Pencil Drawing Artist. Learn The Art of Pencil Drawing From The Experts. A Complete Guide On The Qualities of A Pencil Drawing Artist.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment