Combining all the techniques in one street scene

Watercolor Townscape

Having introduced the various techniques, let's now show how they combine to produce a unified finished painting. This unity can be best achieved during the initial stages by regarding the buildings as simple blocks of color, which will later be decorated and brought to life by windows, doors and figures.

The wet-into-wet beginning

After the paper has been thoroughly saturated, the initial washes go in — the blocking in, which will hold the entire painting together. It is impt>rtanr at this stage to let the various warm and cooI colors run together, as shown below. This tall give the finished painting an overall glow.

The dry brush strokes in calligraphy

This is where the speed of the brush is important to give spontaneity to the whole painting. Using stronger and richer pamt, a quick and light flick of the brush will provide the kind of vitality impossible to obtain with a slow, ponderous stroke. It is almost like shorthand.

Shopping Scenes Watercolours

Shopping in Cortona, 15 x 11" (38 x 28cm)

The resulting painting exudes warmth and movement and the holiday makers are clearly enjoying themselves.

Combining the techniques

This where it all comes together. The fresh, free initial washes will glow through the dark areas and semi-details. The various techniques should come together joyously, each important in it's own way and yet interdependent on the others, like instruments in an orchestra.

Dark Shadows Caricature

C^ars should naturally bien

Draw in pencil

Pencil sketches like the one above can be done in minutes. Your cars will soon begin to look authentic. Paint dark shadows under the cars to hold them down.

Sketch in watercolor

Next try portraying quick little watercolor sketches, just concentrating on the cars, but without any details, whatsoever.

No details needed

Even in a finished painting, like this (shown again on page 79), only the general proportions matter — your viewer zvill imagine the details.

Watercolour Painting Cars Techniques

C^ars should naturally bien

You can't ignore cars in street scenes, much as some of you would like to. Moving and parked cars are a fact of life so you might as well learn to draw them properly. First of all, they should form a natural part of the scene and not look as though they have been added on as an after thought. A row of parked cars forms a single unit and so they need not be drawn in separately. Don't worry about such things as wheels and ellipses — look at the cars on these two pages and you won't see any. Once you get the general proportions of the cars right, you are there. You can learn this by taking the time to make pencil sketches of them like the drawing at the top left. Do this for a few hours and they will soon become instinctive. Look through the book and you will see how simply and economically David has indicated his cars.

Draw in pencil

Pencil sketches like the one above can be done in minutes. Your cars will soon begin to look authentic. Paint dark shadows under the cars to hold them down.

Sketch in watercolor

Next try portraying quick little watercolor sketches, just concentrating on the cars, but without any details, whatsoever.

No details needed

Even in a finished painting, like this (shown again on page 79), only the general proportions matter — your viewer zvill imagine the details.

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