Info

When drawing the mouth, the upper lip is usually in shadow from overhead lighting. The lower lip typically has more direct light and a highlight. The upper lip will often cast a shadow on the lower lip when the lips are together and on the teeth when the lips are apart.

There is a ridge of transition between the skin of the face and the flesh of the lips. This area is slightly lighter than the surrounding skin and is more noticeable on people with darker flesh tones and on men.

There is often a shadow beneath the lower lip above the chin. The larger the lower lip, the more likely the shadow will be evident.

When drawing the mouth open, draw the teeth as a single mass with shading. Come in later and define the individual teeth, as shown in Figure 4.33. Remember that the teeth are generally in shadow even though they are white.

Figure 4.32 The mouth curves around the face.

Figure 4.32 The mouth curves around the face.

Figure 4.31 The lips frame the mouth. Figure 4.33 The teeth are usually in shadow from the upper lip.

Figure 4.31 The lips frame the mouth. Figure 4.33 The teeth are usually in shadow from the upper lip.

Ears vary widely in shape and size from person to person. Some people have large ears, and some have small ears. Some ears lay flat against the skull, while others protrude. Older people tend to have larger ears than younger people because the ear continues to grow throughout our lives. Even though the ear is not prominently placed on the front of our faces, it is still a significant facial feature and should not be ignored. Figure 4.34 shows the major parts of the ear.

The ear is basically a sound-catching mechanism and, as such, acts as a funnel for sound waves. The fleshy outer parts of the ear channel sound to the concha, and then the inner ear through the ear can-nel. An anterior notch protects the ear canal from damage.

Figure 4.34 The human ear.

The ear is made up of a stiff yet flexible tissue that keeps its shape but can bend when needed. A ridge of skin called the helix surrounds the upper and back of the ear. The lower part of the ear forms a lobe and is more flexible than the rest of the ear.

When drawing the ear, think of the many shapes and shade them according to the shading principles discussed earlier. There are many areas of cast shadow and reflected light. Most drawings view the ear from the front of the face, as shown in Figure 4.35.

Figure 4.35 The ear is seen from the front in most portraits.

Figure 4.34 The human ear.

Figure 4.35 The ear is seen from the front in most portraits.

Hair

Okay, I know hair is not considered a facial feature, but it is part of the head so we will take a look at it as well. Hair is not an individual feature, such as a mouth or an eye, but rather it is made up of many separate strands. Often artists find hair difficult to draw because they don't understand how it catches light and how it flows. Figure 4.36 shows some of the basic aspects of drawing hair.

Hair is usually shiny and catches light with many highlights. It is usually a good idea to look at the highlights and shadow areas of hair first. The highlights will be the white of the paper unless the hair is very dark. Draw in the shadow areas first. Then draw in the transitional areas with individual pencil strokes emanating from the shadow areas toward the highlight areas. Each stroke should start dark and then lighten as pressure is released from the pencil.

Figure 4.36 Hair is made up of many individual strands.

Longer hair usually clumps in locks. A head of hair is made up of several overlapping locks. This is most evident in longer wavy or curly hair.

When the hair is parted, as shown in Figure 4.37, there is usually a shadow area near the scalp and a highlight as the hair changes direction and lies against the skull.

As you can see, there are many facets to each facial feature on a head. I suggest that you spend some time working on each feature until you feel comfortable drawing it. Fill some sketchbooks with pictures of eyes, noses, mouths, ears, and hair. When you feel you've mastered the individual features, try putting them together. Figure 4.38 shows a finished head.

Figure 4.37 A highlight runs parallel to a part in the hair.

Figure 4.36 Hair is made up of many individual strands.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Pencil Drawing Beginners Guide

Pencil Drawing Beginners Guide

Easy Step-By-Step Lessons How Would You Like To Teach Yourself Some Of The Powerful Basic Techniques Of Pencil Drawing With Our Step-by-Step Tutorial. Learn the ABC of Pencil Drawing From the Experts.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment