Skeletal Strokes

The use of skeletal strokes[27,28] is a new realization of the brush and stroke metaphor. It does not use physical models (e.g. bristles of brushes or properties of paper) nor use repeated patterns as the basic drawing unit. Instead, an arbitrary picture and its deformation are abstracted into a skeletal stroke to draw with. This structured approach turns out to be far more general than those based on physical models. It is a rich framework for general picture deformation yet the only control parameter required is the brush path itself. The deformation of individual parts of a picture can be independently controlled. Higher order strokes can be used to build up complex pictures, while recursive strokes can be made to generate and manipulate fractals. Some effects that can be achieved include marks made by a bristle brush or a flat nib pen, the effects of wood cut and water-based ink with blotting effects (figure 4). With the use of the higher order anchoring mechanism, it is capable of giving an illusion of objects rotating. This is invaluable in the creation and manipulation of pseudo-3D models.

Figure 4: An assortment of effects with skeletal strokes. (a) Constant thickness skeletal stroke, (b) strokes with bending and twisting, (c) water based ink with a blotting effect, (d) 2 applications of a stylish stroke, (e) more than an ordinary flat-nib pen, (f) wood-cut, (g) 3 applications of a stylish stroke.

Figure 4: An assortment of effects with skeletal strokes. (a) Constant thickness skeletal stroke, (b) strokes with bending and twisting, (c) water based ink with a blotting effect, (d) 2 applications of a stylish stroke, (e) more than an ordinary flat-nib pen, (f) wood-cut, (g) 3 applications of a stylish stroke.

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