Additional Tools

"In looking at everybody's work, one thing I noticed is the amazing power of the little white shape, the little white rectangle or white line." —student jane wolansky

Tortillons, stumps, and charcoal pencils are adjuncts to vine charcoal and kneaded eraser. Tortillons and stumps are pointed cardboard cylinders that come in a variety of diameters, to be used for fine blending. Charcoal pencils come in various hardnesses, as do carbon pencils. But they don't produce that lovely, grainy swathe of gray you create with the side of vine charcoal. However, you can draw with the point, and also fill in pencil style with them.

protecting your charcoal drawing

Charcoal is the most fragile drawing medium. If you brush against it accidentally, your work can disappear. For this reason, charcoal drawings should be sealed with fixative, but it must be handled with extreme care, because the fumes are toxic. Follow the cautionary instructions on the fixative can. Spray outdoors ifpossible. Indoor spraying should be only in a well-ventilated area that you can then leave. Never spray inside your living space.

"In looking at everybody's work, one thing I noticed is the amazing power of the little white shape, the little white rectangle or white line." —student jane wolansky

Overly active cast shadows (above, left) can be tamed with level strokes (above, right) that mimic the horizonal direction of the table surface.

Homework

Once you finish your first piece on charcoal ground, forget the ground and draw directly with your charcoal point. Fill in values and shadows to the extent you want. Experiment and enjoy yourself. Extend your choice of subject matter, but stay with multidimensional objects. Make sure to light them for more dramatic effects.

"I was thinking later on that the reason it came out so well is I enjoyed what I was drawing. Plus, I wasn't in a hurry. I didn't mind if I sat there, because that's what I wanted to draw. "

-student jamie keever

Drawing Charcoal Vegetable

"I signed up for a five-hour workshop. As the day unfolded, I followed each step of instruction, each little success giving me the courage to continue. When I first looked at the array of fruit and vegetables, the cabbage seemed to wink at me. I thought, No you don't—I'll do an apple. Then I thought, What the hell? What's the worst that can happen? It won't turn out, and I'll try something else. As the cabbage began to take shape on my paper, it was working. I just followed the lines, drew what I saw, erased the charcoal to show the light. I relaxed, didn't worry, had fun. I nearly cried several times during the day—not from fear, but from the joy of knowing that this part of me was being accessed. I could actually learn how to draw!" —student nancy opcaard

How Draw Student Robots

chapter 7

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Freehand Sketching An Introduction

Freehand Sketching An Introduction

Learn to sketch by working through these quick, simple lessons. This Learn to Sketch course will help you learn to draw what you see and develop your skills.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment