Additional Accuracy Tools

By now, you've filled your artistic toolbag with a lot of accuracy techniques. It's getting heavy, so why add more? Now that you can sketch groups of objects, lining up and sighting are the keys to reproducing their relative placement and proportion with accuracy. Later on, they'll be your most reliable precision tools for drawing the face.

Rectangular objects appear regularly in beginner work, so drawing them accurately is important because a wonderful still-life drawing can be disturbed by a lopsided tabletop. Even without detailed instruction on perspective, a beginner can learn practical ways to draw angles in order to represent them with more confidence.

sighting essential

Always hold your pencil at right angles to the ground during an entire sighting exercise, even if you feel like pointing to the subject as your arm moves up and down.

LINING UP AND SIGHTING TECHNIQUES

Lining up is a variation on the level and plumbline, and is one of the most useful tools at your disposal. It's a technique that helps you record the patterns you see more accurately. Your purpose is to find two or more reference points that fall along a straight line. For example, the words on this page are lined up along horizontal lines, and along verticals at the margins, even though these "sight lines" are invisible.

Stand in front of a mirror to find some more ways to sight objects along both level and plumblines. Hold your pencil above your head horizontally, lowering it until it reaches your eyebrows. The tops of both brows fall along a level sight-line reinforced by your pencil. Lower it once again to find your earlobes along another level. Hold your pencil vertically to find the vertical sightline between your pupils and sides of your mouth.

Squint while you hold a pencil vertically and scan the room around you. Make sure your head follows the vertical as it moves. Bring the contour edge of right: Use your pencil as your vertical sight line.

Vertical Lines Above And Below Lips

right: Use your pencil as your vertical sight line.

below: The lines drawn from eye to object in this sketch represent "sight lines" as well. Hold your pencil with the point up, your arm outstretched. Focus beyond the pencil at your subject, which should be about ten feet away.

Sight Size Drawing Instruction

Measure a smaller object against a larger one to determine their size relationship. Here, the bottle is about three apples high. The apple is drawn first, and then the bottle is drawn at a height equivalent to the three stacked apples.

Once again, your plumbline comes in handy. We don't need to worry about verticals and horizontals on the stove; it's the angles at the right and left front stove top corners that we're interested in.

an apple and a bottle. Align your pencil point with the visible top of your partner's head (or top of the apple). If your partner has big hair, pull the point down a bit to adjust the reading (a bald partner is a plus here). Keep your pencil point in this position while you shimmy your thumb and forefinger down the pencil to a point aligned with your partner's chin (or bottom of the apple). The space between your pencil point and your thumb and forefinger will mark the length of your partner's head, seen from a distance. You now have a unit measuring "one head" (albeit a shrunken one) on your pencil. Keep your fingers in that position on your pencil. Move the pencil point to your partner's chin and count "two heads," and so on. Use that unit to count down the length of your partner's body. You're measuring how many heads high your partner is. A Barbie doll is eight or so; you're doing fine if you come in at six to seven heads.

Measure a smaller object against a larger one to determine their size relationship. Here, the bottle is about three apples high. The apple is drawn first, and then the bottle is drawn at a height equivalent to the three stacked apples.

Once again, your plumbline comes in handy. We don't need to worry about verticals and horizontals on the stove; it's the angles at the right and left front stove top corners that we're interested in.

the top part of your pencil to the contour edge of another object. Look down the pencil vertical to see if an edge or feature of another shape touches this vertical. Move the pencil around, "sighting" other references. This technique helps you replicate the visual pattern in front of you. Lining up can locate reference points along horizontal and diagonal sight lines as well as vertical ones.

Sighting is a widely used technique for estimating relative sizes accurately. Practice sighting with a partner (or by yourself, if you have a full-length mirror), or use two objects of different sizes, like

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Freehand Sketching An Introduction

Freehand Sketching An Introduction

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  • Marcho
    How to Use Sighting in Drawings?
    7 hours ago

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