Windows and Doors

WITHOUT WINDOWS AND DOORS, A BUILDING IS LITTLE MORE THAN AN UNINHABITABLE SHELL. IN FACT, IT IS OFTEN THESE FEATURES THAT PERSONALIZE BUILDINGS AND TURN THEM INTO RECOGNIZABLE HOMES.

Windows and doors give more clues to the human element than most other parts of a building, and it is often this that is most interesting to artists. The intricacies of the decorative ironwork on this door study were a challenge to record and needed considerable sketching with a pencil before I set about working in paint. But the appeal was not so much the difficulty of the challenge ot recording the door, but the story the door could tell. The exposed wiring, the lack of maintenance, the paintings hanging outside - all of these things tell a story of many different lives. But who, w hy and when? As a study, the peeling paint and the damp plaster were a pleasure to record, but the question as to what went on behind that door was never far from mv mind.

The deepest greens in this study were achieved by mixing sap green with ultramarine and a touch of burnt umber

The fine detail in this study was applied with a fine brush, but only when the underwash had dried fully

Textures of faded plaster were created by dropping water onto damp paper, allowing the paint to dry with a

The deepest greens in this study were achieved by mixing sap green with ultramarine and a touch of burnt umber

The fine detail in this study was applied with a fine brush, but only when the underwash had dried fully

DOMLS1U HL II.DINtiS

The glass was painted using a combination of ultramarine and cobalt blue

Colours used in this study:

Cobalt blue

Ultramarine

The section of wall between the wooden window frame and the outer brickwork will nearly always be in shade. The colour used here was created by mixing cobalt blue and burnt umber and applying it as a very watery wash

The glass was painted using a combination of ultramarine and cobalt blue

A suggestion of some of the bricks is always preferable to the laborious recording of every one

Domi-stic Window

The bricks in this study were painted using burnt sienna, burnt umber and cobalt blue. This was painted on top of a raw sienna underwash

Colours used in this study:

Burnt umber

Burnt sienna

Cobalt blue

Ultramarine

Raw sienna

Windows, like other parts of a building, tend to have typically indigenous or national characteristics, lint the one thing that most windows have in common these days is that they are set back into the fabric of the wall.

In most domestic buildings, glass is held in a wooden frame, and this is set into a brick, stone or wooden wall. The study above illustrates clearly both the construction (a wooden frame set into a brick wall) and the human element (the vase of flowers) which increases the appeal of the study.

The brickwork in this study was painted on top of a raw sienna underwash. When this had dried, the bricks were painted using a small brush and a selection of colours mixed with burnt sienna, burnt umber and cobalt blue. When this had all dried, I put in the shadow that tells us that the window frame is set back into the wall. Using a medium-size brush and a mixture of cobalt blue and burnt umber, the paint was pulled across the wooden frame and the inner brickwork. A harsh line along an inset such as this will always suggest a strong shadow and enhance the three-dimensional appearance of a wall into which windows and doors are set. Similarly, a strong shadow underneath a w indow ledge reinforces and enhances this effect.

DOMF.SIU IfUIIDINC.S

Freehand Sketching An Introduction

Freehand Sketching An Introduction

Learn to sketch by working through these quick, simple lessons. This Learn to Sketch course will help you learn to draw what you see and develop your skills.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment