Symmetry

Burnt sienna

Raw sienna

Till-: SYMMETRY OF ARC I 11 TEC TUR I IS APPEALING TO All Ol US WITH A FEELING FOR DESIGN, BUT WHEN THE BUILDING MATERIALS ARE AFFECTED BY THE UNPREDICTABLE EFFECT OF WEATHERING, A DEGREE OF ASYMMETRY IS INTRODUCED, WHICH GIVES ADDITIONAL INTEREST.

Burnt sienna

Raw sienna

The decorative details and carvings Ultramarine were treated to a light underwash.

When this had fully dried, a deep colour (ultramarine and burnt umber) was painted behind them using a small brush

The warmth of the old stone was created by applying a raw sienna underwash and making sure that all subsequent colours were mixed with a burnt umber base

The faded appearance of the old wooden door was created by applying a wash of burnt umber and cobalt blue directly onto white paper (without an underwash). The paint dried to an appropriately washed-out look

I find that the washing and blotting technique creates a visually attractive outer edge to a working sketch lOltMAI BUII.DINCS

Project: Classical Frontac.e

I An underwash of raw sienna was washed freely across the tj •• c-- - •

line drawing using a large brush, and left to dry with little intervention.

2 Burnt sienna and raw sienna were mixed together to create the terracotta stone colours and painted on top of dry paint. Clear water was then dropped onto the drying paint to create textures.

The pure symmetry of this elaborate façade was the first thing to catch my eye. Only later did I appreciate the full range of warm sienna tones that the stonework held.

Having drawn the main lines of symmetry running both vertically and horizontally across the paper, and then completed the curves of the arches, a very free wash of raw sienna was applied rapidly across the line drawing with a large brush, leaving only the spaces between the arches blank. (I had already decided that they would be left blank to avoid any visual overload. The intricacies of the stonework and its rich colours were more than adequate.) This was left to dry, as the next stage required a level of control.

Using a medium-size brush, the next application was painted onto the upper section of the building. A mixture of burnt sienna and raw sienna was mixed to record the almost terracotta tones of the warm sunbaked stone. Again, this was painted in a very free manner to prevent it drying with a smooth finish. In fact, just to make certain that little of the paint dried evenly, a few-drops of clear water were dripped onto the damp paint and allowed to bleed and dry without blotting. This created the hard lines caused by patchy plaster and the effects of damp on a stone wall. This was then allowed to dry before the next stage of establishing the shadows was attempted.

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3 A small brush was used to apply burnt umber and ultramarine to damp sections of stone, with burnt sienna dropped on top of the bleeding paints.

Large, complex buildings will require you to make some decisions about how much you include in your composition. It will rarely be practical to paint the entire site. For this reason I chose to fade the paint out at the edges g jo g jo

4 Burnt umber and ultramarine were painted underneath ledges and decorations using a small brush, and pulled downwards using clear water.

One of the major visual factors that suggests age on a building is rising damp. I therefore decided to start at the bottom and paint my way towards the top.

The first application of paint was a mixture of burnt umber and ultramarine, which was applied to the very base (if the wall and pulled upwards, using a small brush. To counteract the hard edges that would have been created had this wash been allowed to dry, I dropped a little burnt sienna at the very top of the wash, and this bled downwards, creating the impression of exposed brick. The same principle was used on both sides of the central arch - a succession of washes and clear water dropped on top of each other and allowed to bleed and find their own direction. While the structure was symmetrical, the tones and colours did not follow this predetermined pattern.

The windows reflected the sky and the colours of the day. They were painted with a mixture of cobalt blue and ultramarine, with a touch of burnt umber to deepen the tone

Fok.viai cratel iousi.

I decided not to paint any detail observed through the arches as I did not want to draw the viewer's eye away from the architectural detail

A raw sienna underwash was applied across the entire building

The windows reflected the sky and the colours of the day. They were painted with a mixture of cobalt blue and ultramarine, with a touch of burnt umber to deepen the tone

Fok.viai cratel iousi.

I decided not to paint any detail observed through the arches as I did not want to draw the viewer's eye away from the architectural detail

A raw sienna underwash was applied across the entire building

Having established the tones ami textures on the lower part of the building, some serious work had to be put into the shading 011 the upper section. As 1 had already begun the process of creating the textured finish to the wall, the shading would be relatively simple. A small brush was used to run a dark mixture of burnt umber and ultramarine around the edges of the plaster decoration and underneath the ledges. Before this had time to dry, the same brush was used to pull the colour downwards, dropping a little clear water around the edges to soften them for the final touch.

The windows w ere painted using assorted combinations of cobalt blue, ultramarine and burnt umber to complete the painting of this stone facade.

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