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Raw sienna underwash

The texture on these stone pillars was created by dropping a watery mix of burnt umber and ultramarine onto a wet raw sienna underwash

Brickwork painted with a combination of burnt umber and burnt

The texture on these stone pillars was created by dropping a watery mix of burnt umber and ultramarine onto a wet raw sienna underwash

A warm grey was created in this study by starting with burnt umber and gradually adding a touch more ultramarine until the correct tone was achieved. The first colour that you mix will usually remain the most dominant colour

Highlights on the edges of the stone surround were created by allowing pure white paper to show through

Raw sienna underwash

The gradated shading on the stone doorway was created by running a line of dark paint in the deepest recesses with a small brush. A medium brush was then selected to run a line of water quickly along the edge of the paint. The paint and water mixed and bled freely, drying to a gradated tone

Ultramarine and burnt umber (a warm neutral grey)

Black is not needed for shadows. The shaded areas on this white door were all created with combinations of blues and browns

Watery wash of cobalt blue

Ultramarine and cobalt blue mixed together enhance the shadows without adding too much depth of tone (a more subtle blend than the mix wich burnt umber)

Cobalt blue

Ultramarine

Colours used for shading on white door:

Burnt umber

Win 11 Door

Watery wash of cobalt blue

Colours that are commonly referred to for their colour temperature value usually mix well. For example, warm ultramarine and the colder cobalt blue work particularly well together here

Ultramarine and cobalt blue mixed together enhance the shadows without adding too much depth of tone (a more subtle blend than the mix wich burnt umber)

While the decorative plaster surround and the wooden door in this study were actually painted white, very little of the door was left white by the time I had completed the sketch.

Unless you are faced with glaring sun shining directly onto a white object, you will usually find that to record white features such as doors in watercolour w ill involve treating much of your subject to an extremely tlnn and watery wash of a neutral grey.

Warm greys can be mixed using ultramarine (or ultramarine violet) and burnt umber in small quantities, w hereas cold greys can be mixed with cobalt blue and burnt umber. A neutral grey, however, could be treated by mixing cobalt blue and ultramarine, and then just a touch of burnt umber to give some depth to the tones.

This mixture will be diluted even more w hen washed onto the door with a wet brush and then pulled around a little using clear water, creating a highly translucent paint which tints rather than covers whatever is beneath it.

Ultramarine and burnt umber (a warm neutral grey)

Cobalt blue

Ultramarine

Colours used for shading on white door:

Burnt umber

Win 11 Door

Black is not needed for shadows. The shaded areas on this white door were all created with combinations of blues and browns

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