Sketchbook Studies

A SKETCHBOOK IS AN ARTIST'S MOST VALUABLE TOOL. TllEY COME IN MANY SIZES, CAN BE CARRIED EASILY, AND CAN BE USED TO MAKE VISUAL NOTES WHEN TIME, OR PERSONAL INCLINATION, DOES NOT ALLOW FOR ANY MORE PAINTING.

The brickwork surrounding a window frame is worth

I cannot overemphasize the value and importance of sketchbook studies. They allow you to make as many visual notes as you wish, to gain information about the nature of the building you are painting, to find out about the qualities of the paint and paper that you are using, and the best techniques to use for your particular subject.

My principles for sketching are straightforward - the natherinii of information, and the exploration of the qualities of the fabric of the particular building or buildings that I have chosen for my subject.

In the on-site sketch of an old town house on the opposite page, I have made a general sketch together with some studies of details. A sketch does not have to be the same as a finished picture. For instance, it is not necessary to draw or paint in all the windows. An enlarged study ol the way in which the wooden window frame sits in the recess may be of more value. Equally, a study of the brickwork 011 one of the columns may be of more value than recording all the decorative brickwork.

As I said on page l<L I use very simple equipment for sketching. This makes it easy to sketch a scene from a car window.

Because I usually use only one brush when I am sketching, most of my brushstrokes will be of a similar size and nature. I therefore tend to use the technique of dropping water onto damp paint and allowing it to flow freely, carrying the paint with it. to create areas of surfaces such as walls or tiled roots - especially where textures are involved - and I use the tip of the brush only for creating specific details 011 shadows.

treating as a separate study, and will provide useful information at a later date as your memory for detail fades

The brickwork surrounding a window frame is worth

I QUII'MHNT AND TECHNIQl I S

Town I iousi- Sketchbook Study Burnt sienna and burnt umber

Burnt sienna

Raw sienna

Burnt umber

Depth of tone is created with — burnt sienna and burnt umber with the addition of ultramarine

It is important to note the directions of shadows

Features such as windows often have a variety of designs in the more attractive buildings

Burnt sienna

Studies of the tonal aspect of architectural details in a sketch will help to prevent a building from looking flat

Colours used for this study:

Cobalt blue

Ultramarine

Features such as windows often have a variety of designs in the more attractive buildings

Burnt umber

Depth of tone is created with — burnt sienna and burnt umber with the addition of ultramarine

It is important to note the directions of shadows

Burnt sienna

Burnt sienna

Studies of the tonal aspect of architectural details in a sketch will help to prevent a building from looking flat

Colours used for this study:

Raw sienna

Cobalt blue

Ultramarine

IzQUII'MINI AM) IICHNIQUIS

Freehand Sketching An Introduction

Freehand Sketching An Introduction

Learn to sketch by working through these quick, simple lessons. This Learn to Sketch course will help you learn to draw what you see and develop your skills.

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