Finding the View

In This Chapter

^ What is a viewfinder frame? ^ Materials to get you started ^ How to use a viewfinder frame ^ Drawing what you see in the viewfinder frame

Drawing should suggest and stimulate observation.

Bernice Oehler Figure Sketching, (Pelham NY: Bridgman Publishers, 1926).

Working with the plastic picture plane has shown you 3-D space condensed into a drawable 2-D image on the surface. But it's also shown you the beginnings of another concept that's important to drawing—looking through a frame to see your subject.

In this chapter, we'll be exploring the concept of a viewfinder frame. Using a viewfinder isn't cheating. As artists have known for centuries, it's a way to help you see spatial relations and make your drawing more accurate.

A viewfinder frame is a simple device that will help you decide on a subject to draw and then focus on it. As we discussed in Chapter 1, "The Pleasures of Seeing and Drawing," framing an image makes it easier to see, and the graduated marks on the edges of the viewfinder frame give you reference points for relations between lines and shapes, rather like the grid on the plastic of the picture plane, but requiring more clear seeing on your part.

Seen through a viewfinder frame, the main points of an image can be drawn on paper using the graduated marks. The important thing is to have the viewfinder frame and your paper or the box that you draw on it in the same proportion, so that the relative positions and placement do not change.

Freehand Sketching An Introduction

Freehand Sketching An Introduction

Learn to sketch by working through these quick, simple lessons. This Learn to Sketch course will help you learn to draw what you see and develop your skills.

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