Blending With Stomps And Tortillions

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These cigar-shaped blending tools are great to work with. I have salvaged quite a few drawings with their help. The drawings on these two pages demonstrate some of the numerous ways to work with stomps and tortillions.

The drawing at top was executed mostly with a chamois stomp. I put some charcoal powder on a separate piece of paper (I save the powder from charcoal pencil sharpenings), then rolled part of the point of the stomp in the powder, and rubbed it lightly on a piece of scrap paper so it wouldn't be too strong in value. I put the distant mountains in first, then the large dark mass of trees. With what was left on my stomp, I modeled the field. I rolled it again in the charcoal powder to get darks in the foreground and the clouds. I took a clean tortil-lion and a kneaded eraser and removed some of the tone in the upper left corner and at the baseline of the trees. I then added a very gentle touch of 2B charcoal pencil along the tree line and the base — just enough to finish the drawing.

The middle drawing was first sketched with a 4B charcoal pencil. Using the leftover charcoal from the drawing, I modeled the rocks with a small tortillion, adding darks and emphasis where needed. The water was modeled with a large stomp, then a few light lines with an HB charcoal pencil completed it.

In the bottom drawing, I covered the whole background with one value of charcoal, then came back with additional darks, building up the tree mass. With an HB charcoal pencil, I added just a lit-

Charcoal Pencil Background

Evening Clouds

3" x 41/2" Charcoal on Strathmore 2-ply bristol.

Evening Clouds

3" x 41/2" Charcoal on Strathmore 2-ply bristol.

Along the Hudson

3" x 41/2" Charcoal on Strathmore 2-ply bristol.

Along the Hudson

3" x 41/2" Charcoal on Strathmore 2-ply bristol.

Evening Fog

3"x4Vi" Charcoal on Strathmore 2-ply bristol.

tie more suggestion of trees to give the effect I desired.

The large drawing on the opposite page was stomped with charcoal powder first, then I modeled the trees and foliage on top of the stomping with a charcoal pencil. When using a stomp, avoid scrubbing the paper too hard, as it will cause the charcoal already laid down to be less pliable.

Nature Drawing With Charcoal

Season's End, 8Va"x 6V4", charcoal on Srrathmore 2-ply bristol.

Charcoal Drawing Mountain
Soaring at Hunter Mountain, 22"x31", charcoal on Japanese (Misumi) paper.

CHAPTER THREE

Pencil Drawings Tortillons

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Responses

  • Faruz
    What are blending stomps for?
    1 year ago

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