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SAO A full drawing number, using the system described. The number within the heavy box is the drawing's unique identification and is the minimum information required by anyone searching for it. It indicates that the drawing is of a 'component' filling an 'internal opening', and that it is number '107' in the series. The K at the left indicates that the drawing has been released for construction purposes.

SAO A full drawing number, using the system described. The number within the heavy box is the drawing's unique identification and is the minimum information required by anyone searching for it. It indicates that the drawing is of a 'component' filling an 'internal opening', and that it is number '107' in the series. The K at the left indicates that the drawing has been released for construction purposes.

The issue is Revision B

to enter it in the register, the system collapses, and might as well have never been started.

It is far better to insist on all consultants preparing and circulating their own drawing register in the way previously described. Each office then has a document against which incoming issues may be checked, and by means of which possible omissions and out-of-date revisions may be noted.

As for the storage of incoming drawings, they may be dealt with in the same way as one's own negatives and stored in drawers or hung vertically. Alternatively, they may be folded into A4 size with the drawing number and title outermost, and stored upright on shelves in numerical order. This is simple and space-saving, but presupposes that a drawing register is available in which the search for the required drawing may be initiated.

Issuing drawings

It has already been noted that the drawing register is not a convenient document for recording the issue of drawings to others. Neither, although it is sometimes used for this purpose, is the drawing itself. Indeed, one should perhaps start by questioning the need for such a record in the first place. That drawings, both on completion and on subsequent revision, should go to the people who need them, is perhaps self-evident. Yet instances abound of site staff working from out-of-date information, of revision B going to the structural engineer but not the M & E consultant, of the quantity surveyor being unaware of the expensive revised detail agreed on site and hastily confirmed by a sketch to the contractor but not to him. The fundamental question for anyone engaged in preparing working drawings—Who am I doing this for?—needs to be asked yet again here. Whoever it is being drawn for needs it, and the common-sense procedure of mentally running through the list of everybody whose understanding of the job is remotely changed by the preparation of the new drawing or revision is a valuable discipline for reducing communication gaps. Send to too many rather than to too few is a good maxim.

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