Head Face

Drawing the head and face is an intimidating prospect, because facial expressions change so quickly that capturing them precisely is a goal that only the most capable artist can attain. Hence, this section will devote no time to studying the action of facial features but will concentrate instead on the relationship of the head, considered as a volume, to the rest of the body.

The Proportions of the Head

According to the law of proportion, the human head equals three and a half times the length of the forehead, so we will divide the height of the head into three and a half units. From this division we derive the following references, which will help you to draw a well-proportioned head: the top of the head, the natural hairline, the position of the eyebrows, the height of the ears, the base of the nose, and the profile of the chin.

Viewed from the front, the human head is like a rectangle three units wide and three and a half units tall. By searching for two lines that divide the rectangle vertically and horizontally, you will find the location of the eyes on the horizontal line, and the central axis of the nose on the vertical line. It is important to notice that the distance between the eyes is close to the width of one eye, and that the lower edge of the lip coincides with a line that divides the two equal halves in tfie lower unit.

Like that of the figure, the law if proportion for the human head is made up of a set of measurements or units that determine its proportions.

The starting point for drawing a face is the tilt line for the vertical axis. Starting from this line, which divides the face in two, you can begin to distribute the rest of the facial features.

Once you have drawn the oval of the head, draw a straight line going from the forehead to the lower chin. Divide the oval into three and a half parts. The upper line will serve to determine where the hairline begins; the second dividing line marks the location of the eyes; the third designates the nose; and the last shows where the chin should go. The mouth is located in the very center of the last segment.

These four drawings of the head in different positions show the changes in the face's measurements when it moves.

Drawing The Head Different

Understanding the law of proportion for the head in profile can be very useful when drawing portraits such as this one. It is then a matter of simply adapting the features and proportions of the person you are drawing to the initial measurements of the law of proportion.

Drawing from the General to the Particular

When drawing die head, one should work from the general to the particular.You must first sketch the basic structure of the head; search for its generic form, its most pronounced or prominent angles. It's enough to draw a set of lines marking the location of each of the elements that will make up the face.

The Face

If you draw freehand, the shape of the face from the front should fit within an oval. If you trace a vertical line to divide the face in two, you can establish an axis of symmetry that will allow you to place the facial features in a proportionate manner; of course, this is only possible if you draw the face from the front.

The base of the nose is located on a line dividing the face down the middle, and the mouth is somewhat above the chin line. To these lines, you can then add a line for the eyebrows, which will then give you an adequate outline for drawing the head and facial features.

The Head in Profile

â– The established proportions for the head in frontal view can also be used for drawing the head in profile. All you have to do is extend the horizontal lines and draw each element of the face, only this time, from the side. The same horizontal divisions used for the frontal view also match the placement of the parts of the face in profile.

Understanding the law of proportion for the head in profile can be very useful when drawing portraits such as this one. It is then a matter of simply adapting the features and proportions of the person you are drawing to the initial measurements of the law of proportion.

It's a good tonal exercise to draw a head using flat tones. This practice consists of observing the model attentively and attempting to divide the different tonal areas into imaginary geometric shapes and then coloring them in.

These four drawings of the head in different positions show the changes in the face's measurements when it moves.

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Responses

  • susanne
    How to draw real faces proportion?
    8 years ago
  • rufus
    How to draw profile body?
    7 years ago
  • robert
    How the body moves sketches?
    7 years ago
  • marko ebersbacher
    How to dRAW PORTRAIT WITH PROPORTIONS?
    7 years ago

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