Superimposing pictures

One successful way to achieve fantasy pictures is by superimposing images. This is frequently done with the photographic technique of double exposure. Alternatively, two matching images can be successfully combined without a high degree of sophistication by the use of tracing paper overlays.

Exploring the head

1 Michael's pencil study self-portrait is made menacing by the addition of a snarling lion copied from a nature magazine and the surprised creatures protruding from his ears.

2 The ghoulish face produced by Mark was achieved by a self-portrait study superimposed over a tracing study of a skull.

3 In this 17th century portrait of a nobleman the artist wished to make a statement about the subject's character via the superimposition of the upside down portrait. Turn the book upside down to see the second face.

4 A very popular 19th century motif was to have images which appear to be one subject, but contain another. In this postcard we can find death.

Fantasy ArtPhoto Art Superimpose

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Human monsters

Mythology has been the breeding-ground for many half-human monsters. The synthesis of creatures and human forms has been used to imply that the hybrid contains some of the characteristics of the combined creatures' appearance. By adding parts of creatures thought to be repellent, eg claws and scales, the frequently unpleasant nature of the mythological creature could be more easily described.

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