Constructing The Features

The skull determines the big picture; the features control the nuances. I've started with the skull to emphasize the importance of having the right framework before you start to work up the details. Get the relationships of one part of the head to another right, and you have a solid foundation for your rendering.

The rest of this book looks at the features and the muscles that act on them. In this section, I start by discussing the fundamentals: the underlying construction and primary forms of the eye, nose, and mouth. By primary forms, I mean "three-dimensional"; it's crucial to visualize the features as solid, rounded objects—not just lines on paper.

Study and draw your own features up close in a mirror. It's also useful to copy the features from master drawings and sculptures, where the forms have already been clarified and interpreted. Also try drawing heads in various positions from your imagination; there's no better way to stretch yourself and find out where the gaps are in your understanding. The better you're able to draw heads without a model, the better you can draw them with one.

THE SYMBOLIC EYE

Facial Expression Symbols

The eyes have it. The eyes, the most compelling feature, are often drawn oversized. This is done by both beginners, accidentally, and nonobjective artists, on purpose. In both cases, the eye is seen as a symbol, not a thing. Symbols, unlike things, are not affected by perspective or light and shade; here, exactly the same symbol is used for two radically different views of the eye. To draw the eye realistically, we have to forget the symbolic view of the eye as a symmetrical oval with a circle in the middle; we have to forget its emotional associations and merely draw it as a collection of shapes and forms, as we would a tree trunk or a rock.

The eyes have it. The eyes, the most compelling feature, are often drawn oversized. This is done by both beginners, accidentally, and nonobjective artists, on purpose. In both cases, the eye is seen as a symbol, not a thing. Symbols, unlike things, are not affected by perspective or light and shade; here, exactly the same symbol is used for two radically different views of the eye. To draw the eye realistically, we have to forget the symbolic view of the eye as a symmetrical oval with a circle in the middle; we have to forget its emotional associations and merely draw it as a collection of shapes and forms, as we would a tree trunk or a rock.

How To Become A Professional Pencil Drawing Artist

How To Become A Professional Pencil Drawing Artist

Realize Your Dream of Becoming a Professional Pencil Drawing Artist. Learn The Art of Pencil Drawing From The Experts. A Complete Guide On The Qualities of A Pencil Drawing Artist.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment