Taper pins and parallel pins

Taper pins, with a taper of 1 in 50, and parallel pins are used on both solid and tubular sections to secure, for example, levers to torque shafts and control rods to fork ends. Some taper pins are bifurcated, or split, and the legs can be opened out for locking. Plain taper pins and parallel pins may also be locked by peening. To prevent slackness, these pins are assembled in accurate reamed holes. Undue force should not be used during the peening process or the security of the fittings may be impaired if the pin is bent.

Figure 16.30(a) shows part of a lever which is fixed to a hollow operating shaft by a bifurcated taper pin. On assembly, a hole is drilled which is slightly smaller than the diameter at the small end of the taper pin and this is enlarged by a taper pin reamer so that the small end of the taper pin, when pushed through the assembly, is flush with the surface. The pin is then driven into position. If the pin is of the bifurcated type, then the legs are spread to form an included angle of about 60°. Figure 16.30(b) shows the same operating lever assembled, but using a parallel pin, which has been peened over after ensuring that the component is adequately supported.

Fig. 16.32 Proportions of split cotter pins to BS 1574

Figure 16.31 shows the general shape of a taper pin. Parallel sides are substituted for tapered sides in parallel pins.

Fig. 16.30

Figure 16.31 shows the general shape of a taper pin. Parallel sides are substituted for tapered sides in parallel pins.

Taper Engineering Drawings
R = d

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Responses

  • ross
    How can draw a taper pin?
    8 years ago

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