Keys and keyways

A key, Fig. 17.1, is usually made from steel and is inserted between the joint of two parts to prevent relative movement; it is also inserted between a shaft and a hub in an axial direction, to prevent relative rotation. A keyway, Figs. 17.2, 17.3 and 17.4, is a recess in a shaft or hub to receive a key, and these recesses are commonly cut on key-seating machines or by broaching, milling, planing, shaping and slotting. The proportions of cross-sections of keys vary with the shaft size, and reference should be made to BS 4235 for the exact dimensions. The length of the key controls the area of the cross-section subject to shear, and will need to be calculated from a knowledge of the forces being transmitted or, in the case of feather keys, the additional information of the length of axial movement required.

Auxiliary View Engineering DrawingKeys And Keyways

Fig. 17.4 Keyway in hub

Round-end parallel key

Round-end parallel key

Gib-head key

Gib-head key

Gib Head Keys DrawingKeys And Keyways

Fig. 17.3 End-milled keyway

Fig. 17.4 Keyway in hub

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  • Shane
    What is key and keyway in engineering drawing?
    8 years ago

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