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Disney Animator Drawing

The inbetween, drawing 2. will be on the path also, and a chart was usually made to determine the tail's exact curve.

on that pattern.

Wollie Reitherman Drawings

here is drawing 3.

animator: Woolie Reither- Jj man— Funny Little Bunnies.

Five separate cycles were used in making the bunnies fill Easter baskets. The top fellow lifted and closed the gate. Eggs rolled down the chute, guided by the rabbit at the left. and two bunnies pulled the baskets through in a continuous line, catch-ing the eggs. Two playful rabbits at the right tossed £ little candied eggs on top. These scenes usually went to eager young animators wanting a chance to show what they can do. This one was done by Wolfgang "Woolie" Reitherman, who became a supervising animator, director, and finally, producer of cartoon features.

few simple inbetweens, the first pole animated bac the second and the second to the third, while one t was moving back to become another.

The public also liked to see elaborate produc lines for fanciful factories that made toys or Ha eggs or imaginative products. These scenes were t ous to animate because of all the moving parts, there was an advantage in everything being in a c; that could be run over and over and over—and usu was. The same was true of the great crowd shots i to start so many pictures. Such a scene was often only contribution that particular animator could n to the whole picture, but if the scene was effecti certainly set the mood and the locale for the w film. That alone made it worth all the work, but it not a favorite assignment. Just slightly better weri long parades of marching flowers or cookies or that were made up of cycles on long pan paper could be pulled through the scene.

Ripple Action

The inbetween, drawing 2. will be on the path also, and a chart was usually made to determine the tail's exact curve.

When Pluto ran. his tail followed a flowing patter of ripples.

Pluto Tail

When Pluto ran. his tail followed a flowing patter of ripples.

on that pattern.

here is drawing 3.

There was no movement in the figures in early animation besides a simple progression across the paper. No one knew how to get any change of shape or flow of action from one drawing to another. There was no relationship of forms, just the same little cartoon figure in a new position on the next piece of paper. One solution to this stiffness of action was to conceive of a figure's appendages as sections of a garden hose. Since no one knew anyhow where bones and muscles might be on a cartoon figure, this worked well—giving great looseness and a fluid movement. There was no suggestion of realism because the concept of the character was not one of realism. This type of movement fit the design perfectly and brought about some funny action with great charm.

However, it was not the type of action Walt wanted, and he was quick to criticize. We can imagine his reaction to the cartoon camel that Oswald has just kicked into action:

"Do his legs have to be so limp like that? They don't look like they could hold up anything.

"Get some straight lines in there, like you've got in Oswald. Doesn't that camel have a knee or an ankle? And you've got the body the same all the time—he can bend back or forward, y'know. And get rid of those limp noodles; get some drawing in it!"

Disney Facial ExpressionsAnimat Rubber

Rubber Animât

Disney Facial ExpressionsDisney Facial ExpressionsDisney Animated Images

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