Cutting And Recomposing

Hypertufa How To Manual eBook

Hypertufa Garden Art Objects

Get Instant Access

Existing images can be combined and collaged to create interesting new visual descriptions that are far more than the sum of their parts. This approach works well with contrasting pairs of drawings; the opposition of lively and colorful, and static and linear, for example.

Art Composition Illusion
Two old drawings of very different styles - one abstract in energetic ink and shellac, and one figurative charcoal - are chosen to create the new work.

A new medium - pastel - is used to unite components.

Elements of other images can be added.

Torn edges of the paper set out new forms within the drawing.

The images are torn, cut, and juxtaposed to create a third dynamic, which was not present in either original.

A new medium - pastel - is used to unite components.

Elements of other images can be added.

Torn edges of the paper set out new forms within the drawing.

The images are torn, cut, and juxtaposed to create a third dynamic, which was not present in either original.

Drawing as a continuous process | 103

drawing EXERCISES

Becoming technically adept at drawing gives you the ability to fulfil your creative intentions. Different people arrive at this point through different means; for some, it is illuminating to comprehend the pathways from brain to hand that underlie all creative mark-making. Exploring these connections through some simple exercises is interesting, although maybe a little unsettling.

Drawing with the "wrong" hand

Drawing by touch

Left Right Brain Illusion

If you are right-handed, draw with your left hand. You wi concentrate much harder on the subject and become aware of your conscious intentions to move your hand.

Cover your subject - here coconuts - with a cloth and draw by touch rather than sight. This makes you access different sensory areas to find the information you need to make marks.

If you are right-handed, draw with your left hand. You wi concentrate much harder on the subject and become aware of your conscious intentions to move your hand.

Cover your subject - here coconuts - with a cloth and draw by touch rather than sight. This makes you access different sensory areas to find the information you need to make marks.

one subject, three approaches

A Grecian vase drawn in a warm, advancing The same vase, drawn in stark white against A doorway and distinct horizon create depth terracotta color displays its surface textures black and the intense blue of the sea, in this version of the jug, which also plays and almost falls foward, out of the drawing. possesses a far more dramatic quality. with color theory.

Inspiration for drawing in the modern era derives from a huge variety of sources and is shaped by a proliferation of new media.

This iconic image by Roy Lichtenstein draws its inspiration from comic-book culture. The artist would cut out and edit graphic images, using his selection as the basis for constructing larger works. Lichtenstein often used projected images to transpose pictures accurately on to working grounds. Roy Lichtenstein

▼ Study for Crinoline

This drawing is part of a series of preparatory works for a sculpture. A few expressive lines in ink conjure up a sense of volume and texture in the dress, and contribute to a sense of fantasy Sophie Hammerton

Gallery | 105

▼ Untitled Chalk on Paper

Repetition of fragile lines across a prepared surface creates rhythmic forms in this semi-abstract landscape, contained by a bolder horizon line. Suppressed color works in conjuction with the banding to evoke a childlike, rainbow-tinged view of the world. Paul Klee

Gallery | 105

F The Gleaners

Compressed charcoal on a textured paper creates a busy surface in this simple drawing. The modular compositional and tonal contrast impart a dramatic edge to the actions of a field worker. Georges Seurat

► Mixed Media on Paper

Forms inspired by nature are caught up in a whirlwind; colored shapes ebb and flow across the prepared paper, drawing the eye repeatedly in a spiral on the pictorial plane. Lorraine Cooke

0 Archaeological finds

Drawing is illusion, and your choice of subject need not be constrained by what is really "out there." The subject of this drawing is a group of real terracotta objects -archaeological finds - combined with a photograph of a classical Greek scene. The two subjects are unified by harmonious composition and by the deliberate use of a restricted color palette. The warm brown and terracotta pastel pencils are sympathetic to both subjects, conjouring up both a sense of antiquity and earthy texture, and of the burnt Greek summer landscape.

Art Composition Illusion

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Freehand Sketching An Introduction

Freehand Sketching An Introduction

Learn to sketch by working through these quick, simple lessons. This Learn to Sketch course will help you learn to draw what you see and develop your skills.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment