Color And Markings

Swastika Ontario

(Figure 18) A German Focke-Wulf Fw.190A-3 carrying the black outlines of fuselage and wing crosses late in the war. Note the absence of a white border around the swastika on the fin.

(Figure 19) Panchromatic film and a filter lighten and emphasize the red band used on the vertical fins of German military airplanes from 1935 into 1938. The black swastika was moved to the fin after the red band and white circle were deleted. Civil-registered German airplanes retained the red band and white circle throughout the war.

(Figure 18) A German Focke-Wulf Fw.190A-3 carrying the black outlines of fuselage and wing crosses late in the war. Note the absence of a white border around the swastika on the fin.

(Figure 20), and on dark backgrounds, it had a narrow white border. For a short time after the red band had been removed, the swastika remained centered between the fin and the rudder. It was soon moved to the fin on most planes, but it was placed on the larger rudders of some aircraft with small fins.

It should be noted that very few WW II German aircraft models appear with swastikas today. Since the war's end, it has been against the law to display the swastika in Germany, and photos of wartime planes that appear in post-war issues of German magazines sometimes have the swastikas blanked out. Various anti-Nazi groups continue working to

(Figure 20) The standard proportions of this white-bordered swastika were applied to the vertical fin of German airplanes from 1940 until the end of the war. The white border was eliminated on some light-colored airplanes.

keep swastikas off all toys and representations of Nazi-era equipment, even in the United States.

Aircraft Swastika

(Figure 20) The standard proportions of this white-bordered swastika were applied to the vertical fin of German airplanes from 1940 until the end of the war. The white border was eliminated on some light-colored airplanes.

JAPAN—Since WW I, Japan has used the "Rising Sun," or "Hinomaru," (the red disc of the Japanese flag), as its national aircraft marking. The Allies, particularly the Americans, derisively called it the "Meatball." When the Hinomaru was used against dark surfaces, it was usually outlined with a white border that was approximately 2 inches wide (Figure 21). The marking was standard for both the Japanese Army and its Navy. (The Hinomaru Red was much lighter and brighter than the dark American Insignia Red.)

At the war's end, a few Japanese military airplanes were allowed to fly during and beyond the surrender negotiations. These planes were painted white and were marked with dark green crosses (Figure 22). In a few cases, airplanes still in camouflage carried their new crosses on white squares that had been painted over the Hinomarus.

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Responses

  • saare
    How to draw a swastika?
    5 years ago
  • Terhi Vanhanen
    How to paint model swastikas?
    5 years ago
  • Gaetana
    How to draw aircraft in color pencil?
    2 years ago
  • mehari
    How to draw aircraft insignia on a mac?
    1 year ago

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