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At the base of the spine, draw a block for the hips, as shown in Figure 2.6. The hips will usually be rotated from the ribcage because the back is flexible and the lower part of the human torso usually counterbalances the upper torso. Figure 2.4 Start by drawing an oval for the ribcage. Figure 2.4 Start by drawing an oval for the ribcage. Now draw lines indicating the shoulders and arms across the top of the ribcage.

Expressions

Facial expressions play a big role in portraying emotion. Often we wear our emotions in our countenance. Sometimes it is pronounced, as in the case of anger, whereas other times it is subtler, as in confusion or daydreaming. One big advantage of Figure Artist as a reference for your drawings is that you can pose the figure's face. Facial expressions can have a huge impact on your drawings. Figures 5.27 and 5.28 show a few examples of facial expressions. Figure 5.27 shows an example of three...

Stepbystep

Figure 7.30 Pose a figure model with a strong light. Figure 7.30 Pose a figure model with a strong light. First set up the lighting of the figure in Figure Artist so it brings out the form by having a single strong light for defining the light side and a more subdued opposing light for the shadow side, as shown in Figure 7.30. A strong light that clearly defines the light and shadow sides of the figure helps to show the form of the body more clearly because of the contrast between the two...

Posing the Figure

The human figure is an expressive form. Often you can tell what people are thinking by how they stand or hold themselves. When doing figure drawings, you will be confronted with the choice of how to pose your figures. This decision can be critical to the success of the drawing. Look at the difference between the stances shown in Figure 5.1. Can you describe the emotion of each figure The human body has an expressiveness that communicates through an unspoken language often referred to as body...

Ending Note

Exploring dynamic poses for figure reference can be a freeing experience for the artist who has only had sedate figures from which to draw. When you think of all the possibilities available through a tool such as Figure Artist, you will quickly notice that many of the limitations of live models are eliminated or reduced. Figure Artist is not and should not be a replacement for studying the live figure, but it is a great tool for an artist to use in planning, developing, and creating figurative...

Posing Multiple Figures

Posing one figure is a challenge, but often the artist will want more than a single figure in the drawing. Sometimes multiple figures can cause problems for the artist because they have to be drawn in relation to each other. You can set up scenes with live models to have multiple figures, but two models usually cost twice as much as one model. With Figure Artist you can add as many figures as you like, and they don't cost any more than the purchase price of the software. Let's take a look at...

Body Language

Body language can be any expressive aspect of a person. It can be as simple as a facial expression or as complex as a way of walking. It includes the way a person moves and the specific position a person assumes in any given situation. Some aspects of body language are cultural, such as bowing or shaking hands, while others are universal, such as narrowing the eyebrows for anger and slumping the shoulders when one is tired. The custom of shaking hands, as shown in Figure 5.23, originated back...

Introduction

Welcome to Figure Drawing with Virtual Models Getting the Most Out of Poser Figure Artist. This book is intended to be your guide to the use of virtual models as a reference tool for the creation of works of art. Recent advancements in technology have made it possible for artists to have good-quality figure reference at their fingertips almost anytime that they need it. This new technology offers great opportunity to study and learn about the human figure in ways that were never available...

The Picture Plane

Whether you are drawing with a pencil on a piece of paper or using a digitizing pad and stylus on a computer to create your figure drawing, you are working in what is called a two-dimensional medium. In other words, the drawing sits on a flat surface. This flat surface is called the picture plane. Another way to think of it is that if you were to frame your drawing, the area inside the frame and mat would be the picture plane. To be good at composing your drawings, you need to take full...

Adjusting Shadows

The default lighting is nice, but for this figure there are some problems. Notice that the cast shadows are very dark, obscuring parts of the figure. Figure Artist allows you to adjust the darkness of the shadows from each light. In Figure 7.21 I lightened the cast shadows on the figure. Notice how the lighting is a lot more pleasant. Figure 7.21 Lighter shadows make the figure more pleasant. Figure 7.21 Lighter shadows make the figure more pleasant.

Shading a Figure

The figure is basically a solid structure that interacts with light in much the same way as the ball used earlier in this chapter. All of the lighting principles of light side and shadow side are present. There are highlights, raking lights, core shadow, reflected light, and cast shadow. All the artist needs to do is determine where the light source is and how the light is falling on the figure. The figure is first broken into a light side and a dark side. From there, the artist defines the...

Purpose

Years ago when I was attending school, I had an English professor who taught me an important lesson about art and life. At the beginning of the term a student asked him about the importance of spelling and grammar. His reply was that while he felt those things were important, he didn't really care if there were a few mechanical mistakes in the work we turned in for our assignments in the class. He was more interested in whether we had anything to say. In other words, he wanted us to do what I...

Balance and Weight

For a figure to look right in its surroundings, it needs to have balance and look like it has weight. One of the problems with posing a figure in a virtual setting, whether it is with a software program such as Figure Artist or with a wooden mannequin, is the fact that it is easy to pose a figure that looks slightly odd or out of place. There could be a number of reasons for this, but the most common one is that the figure may not look like it fits in the setting. The perspective could be off....

Posing with Objects

When you are drawing figures, you might want to also add some objects. Figure Artist has a number of simple objects with which you can have your virtual models inter act. These objects are by no means a complete set of objects for anything you might want to do, but they do form a basic set of shapes that you can use. For example, Figure 8.14 is using a box object from the available objects as a prop with the figures. Figure 8.14 Props can also be added to scenes. The view of the scene is kind...

Lighting the Figure

Without light there is no sight, at least not with our natural eyes. Because figure drawing begins with seeing, a book about figure drawing should have some significant information on the nature of light and how our eyes perceive it. Understanding how light works on objects in a scene helps the artist create a feeling of depth and substance in a drawing. In Figure 7.1 the lighting on the dress indicates that it is a dark satin material. In nature the artist often...

Moving the Point of View

Not only can the pose be dynamic, but the view can be as well. A static view from the side, such as the one shown in Figure 8.8, might not always be the best view of dynamic action. Although the action lines may be strong, the picture can look less dramatic because it is viewed from a perpendicular angle. Poses tend to look more dynamic if the view is at an angle other than a flat view of the action. Although it is not as noticeable in single-character pictures, this becomes very evident in...

The Foot

It is designed for holding the entire weight of the body in balance. Although it is relatively small compared to the rest of the body, the foot is designed to support the body in a wide range of movement. While most all other animals in the animal kingdom walk on all fours, man is the only land creature that can balance walking on two legs without the support of forepaws or a tail. The foot contains 26 bones, similar to the hand's 27, but the bones of the...

Using Figure Artist

One of the biggest advantages of using Figure Artist to set up your characters for figure drawing is the fact that the models are detailed. They have all of their fingers and toes, and they are all proportionally correct. In addition, they are accurate for studies of the head or even of individual features, such as the ear or nose. The models might not have every scrap of detail that an actual person does, but they are a great help as reference for construction and lighting. Figure 4.39 shows a...

Designing Light

With the help of Figure Artist, you will have the opportunity to design the lighting of your figure drawings. Even if all you are doing is exploring lighting for a live model, you can experiment within Figure Artist to find lighting effects that you can later use in your work. Lighting the figure is a core issue with figure drawing that is often just quickly passed over so the artist can start drawing. Without light there could be no figure drawing because the room would be too dark and you...

What Pose

When faced with a white sheet of paper that is supposed to become a figure drawing, one of the first questions an artist must answer is what pose the figure should be in. This is true whether the drawing is a commissioned portrait or a simple figure study. Many elements go into determining the pose for a drawing, but they all begin with the purpose of the drawing. Maybe the drawing is commissioned to illustrate a story. The artist has to visualize the story and think of how the people in it...

Dynamic Figure Drawing

Figure Artist brings a whole new dimension to posing a figure that would be nearly impossible in real life. With Figure Artist, the ability to catch an action pose is limitless. In real-life situations, about the best an artist can do is ask the model to perform an action and then try to capture the action with a camera, which is a haphazard approach at best. Figure 8.1 shows a pose taken from a model in Figure Artist that would be impossible for a live model to hold for more than a fraction of...

Multiple Light Sources

Many times, objects we see in life have more than one light source. This is particularly true of characters or objects that are in interior settings. A single room inside a building might have many lights illuminating a character or object from multiple angles. Each light will have an effect on how the character or object looks. This can often be confusing for the artist who has to track the direction of the lights to understand the angles of the lights. The picture in Figure 7.19 shows the...

Limitations of a Live Model

Although a live model is always the preferred situation for drawing the figure, there are limitations to what you can have a model do. Live models are humans who live in a real world. They get tired. Even a relaxed pose can't be held indefinitely. The following are just a few limitations you will find when posing a live model Gravity affects everything in life, including a model, causing fatigue. Some poses are easier to hold than others for long periods of time. Out of respect and compassion...

Joshua Nava Porn

One of the greatest challenges to confront an artist is drawing the human figure. Our bodies are infinitely complex yet intimately familiar, giving rise to a subject that is difficult to depict accurately yet judged incessantly The human figure is almost overwhelmingly complex for the artist to draw The human figure is an organic structure that defies geometric simplification. It is composed of bones, muscles, and organs, all of which are covered by a flexible layer of skin. The body has many...

Adding Clothing

Not all figure drawing is of nude figures. In fact, artists have to deal with clothed figures more often than with nude ones. The clothing for the models in Figure Artist is similar to the props in that there is not an endless set, but there is enough to represent a good array of options for clothed figures. The real benefit of clothing simulation in Figure Artist is that you can pose your figure, save the file, and then add the clothing and save the file again. You then have a good view of the...

Note

In this drawing exercise, I drew the action line and skeleton much darker than I would normally draw them so that you could see them. Typically I draw the action line, skeleton, and manikin very lightly so I can do a finished drawing over the top of them. You will notice that in Figure 2.26 the action line and skeleton are much lighter. I went in with a kneaded eraser and pulled much of the graphite off the page so that you could better see the manikin drawing. I usually don't erase when I draw...

Image Based Lighting

Figure Artist has a special lighting option for image-based lighting. Image-based lighting is a way of setting up the lighting of a character based on an image of natural lighting. The lighting simulates the lighting effects found in real environments through an image of that environment. When the image is processed through Figure Artist, the program creates lights that simulate the environment. Image-based lights are a quick way to achieve a natural-looking lighting effect without having to...

Beauty

As the old saying goes, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and so it is with the drawings you create. What is beautiful to one person might not be very appealing to another. Some people may love your work, whereas others may hate it. In general, however, there are some basic concepts that help to make your drawings more beautiful by our culture's generally accepted standards for beauty. When it comes to posing the figure, beauty can generally be defined as grace. Capturing the potential for...

Body Proportions Skeleton

Simplified Skeleton Proportion

In this chapter I will cover how to construct the figure using some simplified methods to make the process of drawing a little easier. I will start by showing you how to build a simple structure as the basis for defining dimension and proportion. This structure will become the foundation of your figure drawings. You will then be able to use it to develop a finished figure drawing. At the beginning of every figure drawing, the artist is faced with a daunting task in defining a subject that is...

Y

Figure 2.19 Try to capture the drama of this pose. Figure 2.20 Try to draw the overlapping limbs in this Figure 2.21 This pose is more of a sagging, tired pose. Figure 2.21 This pose is more of a sagging, tired pose. The next step in drawing figures is to create a simplified manikin of the body. The manikin is like the simplified skeleton in that it uses only minimal detail, but unlike the skeleton that works mostly with inner structure of the body, the manikin deals more with surface detail....

The Action Line

Action Line

Now let's take this example even further and push the dynamics a little. Take a look at Figure 8.5 and notice how making the action extreme increases the feeling of drama and power. If you remember from Chapter 5, a pose that has a strong action line is more dynamic than one that doesn't. Figure 8.6 shows the action lines superimposed over the figure pose. Even the lines seem dynamic. All good dynamic poses start with a good dynamic action line. The action line is the unifying element that ties...

Placement

Placement is the arrangement of pictorial elements within the picture frame. It is not merely the placement of the figure rather, it is the placement of all elements of drawing. The elements of drawing are what make up a picture they include points, lines, shapes, and forms. The smallest mark an artist can make and thus the smallest design element is the point. Some drawings, such as stipple drawings, are made up of nothing but points. A stipple drawing is usually drawn in ink on paper. The...